The Role of Trudeau on Online Gambling

With the recent election in Canada going to Justin Trudeau and the Liberal Party of Canada, Canucks are anticipating a new direction for the economy due to increased investments in energy, infrastructure and other aspects of society meant to grow from the root up. But do any of these policies include outlawing gambling in order to prevent locals from losing money so that it can instead be used well in the economy? This article takes a look at whether Canadians should be concerned of the future for gambling as well as partaking in activities such as sports betting.

Amidst these economic plans there has been little discussion Trudeau has proposed on the topic in fact. Unlike in Australia where gambling is an ongoing concern due to the nation having one of the most severe problems, Canada has remained quiet on the issue despite it coming in globally in the top five in terms of average losses per gambler. We would have assumed the topic of gambling would have came up more in the political discussions but foreign policy and job creation seemed to be the bigger issues at the debate.

We have heard chatter about provinces in Canada selectively discussing if gambling should be outlawed or its laws highly altered to prevent highly susceptible gamblers from losing even more. Canada’s government however cannot come to a consensus that could fit the bill across the entire nation and it appears the discussion will remain at the local levels for quite some time before it shifts to the national level. Trudeau is most likely not concerned about this due to his liberal policies that gear more toward giving Canadians freedom of choice. He has never once mentioned that Canada faces this threat internally and is making no new moves to crack down on regulated or scam sites existing across the web that may be hurting locals.

There is talk of further regulating sports betting but Canada’s House of Commons shows it is going strong with its decision to allow for bets such as single sports betting, which has gained attention due to the high risk in losses. Finance ministers are calling on the government at the very least to take more action in oversight, allowing for Canucks to gamble both at land-based and online operations but with the requirement that it be taxed in some way.

Taxing earnings from gambling would be a very smart move if the Canadian government wants to get more money flowing into hospitals, education and other public sectors. Services rendered or earnings won based off a game of chance are nevertheless earnings, just as how income from part-time jobs that is on call need to be taxed. This line of when and how a person makes money is unclear at times, so we think it is not unreasonable to assume that gambling should be included despite our liking for casinos and sports betting. Otherwise, allowing for online operators to exist more freely domestically rather than abroad would give the government a closer connection to monitoring and taxing them, which in turn would generate revenue.

There needs to be a smarter approach than simply assuming people will pay taxes on their earnings, which may come from abroad and be difficult to trace. It is also unreasonable to assume that a government can take away civil liberties of choosing what one partakes in online should it not fall under illegal framework. This topic deserves more discussion and there can be a happy medium for all so perhaps we will hear about this more in the future from politicians such as Trudeau. For now, Canada has a new leader who no longer doesn’t want to gamble on the country’s direction and instead is betting on sound policy to push the country forward amid economic crises that seem to bigger than a Canadian playing online slots at home on their iPhone.

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